History & Sightseeing

Limassol - Kourion Archaeological Site

One of the most spectacular archaeological sites on the island, Kourion was an important city kingdom where excavations continue to reveal impressive new treasures. Noted particularly for its magnificent Greco - Roman Theatre, Kourion is also proud home to stately villas with exquisite mosaic floors and an early Christian Basilica among other treasures.

Limassol - The Sanctuary and Temple of Apollo Hylates at Kourion

Situated about 2,5 kilometres west of the ancient city of Kourion, the Sanctuary of Apollo Hylates was one of the principal religious centres of Cyprus where Apollo was worshipped as Hylates, god of the woodlands.

This well - defined architectural complex in Cyprus offers insight into the development of a Cypriot rural sanctuary from the Bronze Age through to the end of paganism on the island. There were three fairly distinct building periods. The Archaic Sanctuary developed essentially in the 7th century B.C. while the Ptolemaic Sanctuary belongs to the 3rd century BC. Finally, the Roman Sanctuary dates to the 1st century A.D.

Pafos - Tombs of the Kings

The “Tombs of the Kings” are situated close to the sea in the north western necropolis of Pafos (Paphos). They owe their name to their size and splendour – some probably belonged to the Pafian aristocracy, and not because royalty was buried there. They are rock cut and date to the Hellenistic and early Roman periods. Some of them imitate the houses of the living, with the rooms (here the burial chambers) opening onto a peristyle atrium. They are similar to tombs found in Alexandria, demonstrating the close relations between the two cities during the Hellenistic period.

Pafos - Petra tou Romiou - Rock of Aphrodite

This interesting geological formation of huge rocks off the southwest coast in the Pafos (Paphos) district forms one of the most impressive natural sites of Cyprus associated with Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love and beauty.

According to legend, this strikingly beautiful spot is where Aphrodite rose from the waves and the foaming sea and was then escorted on a shell at the rocks known as ‘Rock ofAphrodite’ or ‘Petra tou Romiou’ in Greek. The Greek name, Petra tou Romiou, “the Rock of the Greek”, is associated with the legendary Byzantine hero, Digenis Akritas, who kept the marauding Saracens at bay with his amazing strength. It is said that he heaved a huge rock into the sea, destroying the enemy's ships.

Larnaka Fort

Larnaka (Larnaca) Fort stands on the shore at the south end of ‘Phoinikoudes’corniche and was probably built during the reign of James I (1382 -1398) to protect the town’s harbour. Its original shape remains unknown, but the fort appears to have had the form of a square tower. Rebuilt in 1625 during the Ottoman period, it was used as a prison in the first years of British rule. The present day fort of Larnaka (Larnaca) is a square building of different eras, with a courtyard in the centre. At the entrance of the fort on the north side is a two - storey building, probably of the Ottoman period. It is joined to earlier parts of the original fort in the south and east by a stone wall. Many rooms of the fort are used as a museum, exhibiting items related to its long history. The courtyard is used for cultural events, especially during summer.

Larnaka - Agios Lazaros Church

Situated in the centre of Larnaka (Larnaca), the magnificent early 10th century stone church of Agios Lazaros is one of the most important surviving Byzantine monuments of Cyprus. It was built by Byzantine Emperor Leo VI in exchange for the transfer of the Saint's relic to Constantinople. The church lies over the tomb of Agios Lazaros, the resurrected friend of Jesus Christ who came to ancient Kition in 33 AD and became its first Bishop and Patron Saint. The tomb, along with other marble sarcophagi and box - shaped tombs brought to light during excavations, can be seen inside the church crypt.

The three imposing domes of this Orthodox Basilica Church and the original bell tower were destroyed, probably in the first years of Ottoman rule when the church was turned into a mosque. The brilliant byzantine artistry of the icons and the unique baroque woodcarving of the gold covered iconostasis were completed in 1782 and have survived until today.

Lefkosia - Faneromeni Church

Built in 1872 within the old city walls, this used to be the largest church in Lefkosia (Nicosia). The marble mausoleum to the east of the church contains the relics of the bishops and priests executed by the Ottomans in 1821.

Lefkosia - Archbishop's Palace

A religious, national and political monument, the Old Archbishop’s Palace is an 18th century two - storey building in the heart of Lefkosia (Nicosia) that is closely associated with modern Cypriot history. Next to it is the new Archbishop’s Palace, a two - storey stone building in Neo - Byzantine style housing the offices of the archdiocese and the residence of the archbishop. It was built by Archbishop Makarios III between 1956 and 1960 and also houses the Byzantine Museum and the Library of the Archbishopric. Since the completion of the new Archbishopric, the Old Archbishop’s Palace has housed the Folk Art Museum and the National Struggle Museum.

Property Search

Banners

Travel
Globalserve Consultants Ltd
Dinos Antoniou & Co Ltd
skyscrapers

Copyright © 2017. All rights reserved. Designed and Developed by mmVirtual